Sun Marine Terminals
Review and History

Sun Marine Terminals lies on the Neches River near Nederland just one nautical mile (1.7 kilometers or 1.1 miles west-northwest) of the Port of Neches in Texas. Sun Marine Terminals is about 17 nautical miles upriver via Sabine Lake (18.4 kilometers or 11.4 miles) north-northwest of Port Arthur. Sun Marine Terminals is also about 7.8 nautical miles downriver (12.3 kilometers or 7.7 miles southeast) of the Port of Beaumont.

Sun Marine Terminals is operated by Sunoco Logistics in Nederland, Texas. Sunoco Logistics Partners is a publicly-traded limited partnership that acquires and operates a mix of crude oil and refine products pipelines, terminals and storage facilities, and crude oil and marketing assets.

The Sunoco Logistics Crude Oil Pipeline System includes almost 7900 kilometers (4900 miles) of crude oil trunk pipelines and 805 kilometers (500 miles) of crude oil gathering pipelines in the south and Midwest United States. In Texas, there are about 4748 kilometers (2950 miles) of crude oil trunk pipelines and about 483 kilometers (300 miles) of crude oil gathering pipelines.

The system in Texas is connected to the Sun Marine Terminals, Nederland Terminal, the Mid-Valley pipeline, and other third-party pipelines. Sunoco Logistics Terminal facilities include 42 active refined product terminals with total capacity for eight million barrels for storage, terminaling, blending, and other services.

Sun Marine Terminals, Nederland Terminal, is a 22-million barrel marine crude oil terminal providing storage and distribution services for crude oil refiners and transporters. Sun Marine Terminals blends lubricants and receives, stores, and distributes crude oil, lubricants, feedstocks, petrochemicals, and bunker oils. Sun Marine Terminals has individual tank capacities of up to 660 thousand barrels.

Sun Marine Terminals has five ship docks and three barge berths that receive crude oil and other products. The docks can receive more than two million barrels of crude oil per day. Sun Marine Terminals can also receive crude oil through the company's or other third-party pipelines that include the Shell Houma-to-Houston pipeline from Louisiana, the Cameron Highway pipeline, the ExxonMobil Pegasus pipeline, the United States Department of Energy Big Hill pipeline, and the Department of Energy West Hackberry pipeline.

Sun Marine Terminals, Nederland Terminal, can deliver more than two million barrels per day of crude oil and petroleum products by barge, ship, rail, truck, and pipeline. Sun Marine Terminals infrastructure and operations are continually being upgraded to meet market needs and individual refiner specifications.

The Nederland Rail can offload 30 rail cars per day at Sun Marine Terminals, and the company continues to expand the number of positions it can offload daily. The rail has barge and pipeline capacity to supply crude oil to markets in the Gulf Coast, Houston, and Lake Charles, Louisiana.

The Sunoco Logistics Refined Products Pipeline System operates about four thousand kilometers (2500 miles) of pipelines for refined products in the northeast, midwest, and Gulf coast states. The refined products include many grades of gasoline; middle distillates like heating oil and jet and diesel fuel; and liquefied petroleum gasses like butane and propane.

Sun Marine Terminals, Lay Berths, are owned by Sun Marine Terminals, Houston Marine Services, and Tony Houseman and operated by Sun Marine Terminals, Houston Marine Services, and Neches River Marine Service. Sun Marine Terminals Lay Berths are used to moor and bunker tankers and company-owned barges. They are also used to moor barges for fleeting.

Sun Marine Terminals Lay Berths has three berthing stations. One has berthing distance of 266.7 meters (875 feet) with alongside depth of 10.7 meters (35 feet). A second station has berthing distance of 304.8 meters (1000 feet) with alongside depths of 5.5 and 6.1 meters (18 and 20 feet). The third station has berthing distance of 693.4 meters (2275 feet) with alongside depth of 7.6 meters (25 feet).

The Sun Marine Terminals Lay Berths have mooring anchors in the Upper Lay Berth for berthing vessels of up to 304.8 meters (1000 feet). The Lower Lay Berth is 304.8 meters long and up to 115.8 meters (380 feet) wide with another 304.8 meters available in the turning area. The entrance depth for the Sun Marine Terminals Lay Berths is from 228.6 to 381 meters.

Sun Marine Terminals' Docks A and B are used to ship and receive crude oil. Pipelines extend from these Sun Marine Terminals docks to crude oil storage tanks at Ship Dock 1. Rail tracks link the plant at the rear of the docks to Kansas City Southern Railway. These Sun Marine Terminals docks have berthing distance of 213.4 meters (700 feet) with alongside depth of 6.1 meters (20 feet).

Sun Marine Terminals Barge Dock C has berthing distance of 160 meters (525 feet) with alongside depth of 6.7 meters (22 feet). Pipelines extend from the wharf to five bunker tanks with capacity for 372 thousand barrels, two diesel/lube oil tanks with capacity for 489.8 thousand barrels, and two petrochemical tanks with capacity for almost 3.3 million gallons. The Sun Marine Terminals Barge Dock C is connected by rail with the Kansas City Southern Railway.

Sun Marine Terminals Dock 1 is used to ship and receive crude oil, petrochemicals, and petroleum products; to receive ballast water; and to bunker tankers berthed at the wharf. Rail tracks at the plant link the Sun Marine Terminals Dock 1 to the Kansas City Southern Railway. Sun Marine Terminals' Dock 1 has berthing distance of 266.7 meters (874 feet) with alongside depth of 12.2 meters (40 feet) and is about 91.4 meters (300 feet) wide.

Twelve pipelines extend from this Sun Marine Terminals wharf to 61 crude oil storage tanks with capacity for over 9.7 million barrels. One pipeline links the wharf to two ballast water tanks at the rear with capacity for more than 4.6 million gallons.

Two pipelines connect Sun Marine Terminals' Dock 1 the Department of Energy's Hackberry Site in Louisiana and to its Bill Hill Site in Texas. Two pipelines connect this Sun Marine Terminals wharf to Premcor Refining Group's Lucas Terminal in Port Arthur. Two pipelines link the Sun Marine Terminals Dock 1 to ExxonMobil's Beaumont Refinery and Magpetco tank farm. Sun Marine Terminals Dock 1 also connects by overland pipelines to the West Texas Gulf, Sun Oil East Texas, UNOCAL Corporation, and the Sun Pipeline Company.

Sun Marine Terminals Dock 2 ships and receives crude oil, receives ballast water, and bunkers tankers berthed at the wharf. Dock 2 has berthing distance of 304.8 meters (1000 feet) with alongside depth of 12.2 meters (40 feet). Vessels up to 304.8 meters (1000 feet) in length can berth at shore moorings at Sun Marine Terminals Dock 2.

Tracks serving the plant at the rear of Sun Marine Terminals Dock 2 connect with the Kansas City Southern Railway. Three pipelines at Sun Marine Terminals Dock 2 extend to storage tanks for crude oil, and one pipeline connects the dock to the ballast-water tanks at Dock 1.

Sun Marine Terminals Dock 3 ships and receives crude oil, receives ballast water, and bunkers tankers berthed at the wharf. Sun Marine Terminals Dock 3 has berthing distance of 304.8 meters (1000 feet) with alongside depth of 12.2 meters (40 feet). Vessels to 304.8 meters can berth at shore moorings at Sun Marine Terminals Dock 3, and the dock is connected with Kansas City Southern Railway.

Two pipelines at Sun Marine Terminals Dock 3 extend to crude oil storage tanks at Dock 1, and one pipeline extends to the ballast water tanks at Dock 1. A bunker line and one diesel fuel line connect the wharf to fuel oil storage tanks at Sun Marine Terminals Dock C.

Sun Marine Terminals Dock 4 ships and receives crude oil, receives ballast water, and bunkers tankers berthed at the wharf. Sun Marine Terminals Dock 4 has berthing distance of 304.8 meters (1000 feet) with alongside depth of 12.2 meters (40 feet). Vessels to 304.8 meters can berth at shore moorings at Sun Marine Terminals Dock 4. The dock is connected by tracks serving the plant to Kansas City Southern Railway. Sun Marine Terminals Dock 4 is connected to storage tanks at Dock 1, two for crude oil and one for ballast water. A bunker line and a diesel fuel line connect the dock to storage tanks at Dock C.

Sun Marine Terminals Dock 5 ships and receives crude oil, receives ballast water, and bunkers tankers berthed at the wharf. Sun Marine Terminals Dock 5 has berthing distance of 304.8 meters (1000 feet) with alongside depth of 12.2 meters (40 feet). Vessels to 304.8 meters can berth at shore moorings at Sun Marine Terminals Dock 5, which is connected by tracks serving the plant to Kansas City Southern Railway. Sun Marine Terminals Dock 5 is connected by pipeline to storage tanks at Dock 1, two for crude oil and one for ballast water. A bunker line and a diesel fuel line connect the dock to storage tanks at Dock C.

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