Port Manatee
Port Commerce

Port Manatee was created by the Florida Legislature in 1967 as a dependent special district governed by the Manatee County Port Authority. The port authority is a seven-member board that sets policy and oversees the port's major expenditures. Port Manatee is not part of the county government, and it does not receive ad-valorem tax income from the county's residents.

Port Manatee is the closest deep-water seaport in the United States to the Panama Canal. The port has connections to highways. Port Manatee has four-minute access to Interstates-75 and Interstate-275. It is also conveniently located to Interstate-4 and to U.S. Highways 19, 41, and 301. The Class III railroad at Port Manatee connects to CSX Transportations' rail system, and the Port Manatee 300-car capacity rail system includes 14.5 kilometers (nine miles) of track, 20 switches, and nine crossings.

Port Manatee is connected to the main Tampa Bay Shipping Channel by the Manatee Harbor Channel. The Channel is 122 meters (400 feet) wide with a depth of 12.2 meters (40 feet) at mean low water. The Port Manatee's turning basin diameter is 396 meters (1300 feet). Draft at the Port Manatee berths is 12.2 meters (40 feet).

Port Manatee can accommodate vessels up to Panamax length. It has two mobile harbor container cranes and several multi-purpose cranes for containers as well as heavy-lift, project, bulk, breakbulk, and general cargoes.

About nine million tons of cargo moves through Port Manatee each year. The major cargoes handled in Port Manatee include tropical fruits and vegetables, citrus juices, refined petroleum products, forestry products, non-ferrous metals, steel, finished phosphate fertilizers, and cement and cement clinker.

Port Manatee also handles project cargo like components for power plants and bridges, heavy machinery, and over-sized vehicles. Port Manatee exports fruit and petroleum, cement, and forestry products. It both imports and exports orange juice. Port Manatee's primary exports include fertilizer and automobiles.

Port Manatee contains over 23 acres (one million square feet) of space for offices and public warehouses. There are 4.7 acres (202 thousand square feet) of refrigerated space including over one-half acre (30 thousand square feet) of freezer space. Port Manatee has 168 reefer plugs and 40 portable receptacles.

Today, Port Manatee has almost 2.4 kilometers (1.5 miles) of berthing space for ocean-going vessels. An additional 482.8-meter (1584-foot) of deep-water berthing has just or will soon be added.

The Manatee County Port Authority owns all berths in Port Manatee and operates each one jointly with commercial interests.

Berth No. 10 is jointly operated by the port authority, Del Monte Fresh Produce Company, Citrosuco North America Inc., Port Manatee Forestry Terminal Inc., and Coastal Fuels Marketing Inc. Berth 10 receives and ships conventional and containerized cargo, petroleum products, and juice concentrates. Port Manatee's Berth 10 receives lumber, automobiles, aluminum ingots, fruits, and vegetables. It is also used for bunkering vessels. Berth 10 has berthing space of 365.8 meters (1200 feet) with alongside depth of 12.2 meters (40 feet) MLW.

Located on the south side outer end of the Port Manatee Ship Basin, the port authority offices are located at the rear of Berth 10. Coastal Fuels Marketing has five pipelines connecting the wharf to 16 storage tanks at the rear with total capacity for 1.5 million barrels of petroleum products. One pipeline connects to two tanks with one million barrel capacity at the Florida Power and Light Company's tank farm. Berth 10 has no railway connections. There are outlets for 89 refrigerated containers at the rear of Berths 9, 10, and 11.

Berth 11 is operated jointly with Port Manatee Forestry Terminal Inc. and Del Monte Fresh Produce Company. Port Manatee's Berth 11 receives and ships conventional and containerized general cargo. Port Manatee receives fruits and vegetables, automobiles, steel, lumber, and liner board. It is also used for mooring vessels. Berth 11 has no rail connections.

Del Monte has a 1.3 acre (60 thousand square foot) chilled warehouse at Port Manatee's Berth 11 and a second 1.3 acre (58 thousand square feet) building with one acre (47 square feet) of chilled space at the rear of the wharf. Located on the south side of the entrance to the Port Manatee Ship Basin, Berth 11 has berthing space of 146.3 meters (480 feet) with alongside depth of 12.2 meters (40 feet) MLW.

The Manatee County Port Authority owns and operates Berth 12 to receive and ship conventional general cargo. Berth 12 at Port Manatee also ships and receives fruits and vegetables and lumber. Berth 12 was under construction at the time of writing. The planned 482.8-meter (1584-foot) wharf will have about 80 acres of open storage at the rear of the wharf. Located at the south of the entrance to Port Manatee, Berth 12 currently has berthing space of meters 304.8 (1000 feet) with alongside depth of 12.2 meters (40 feet).

Berth 5 is operated jointly with several commercial interests: WSI of the Southeast LLC, Martin Marietta Aggregates, Vulcan Materials Company, Citrosuco North America Inc., and Port Manatee Forestry Terminal Inc. Berth 5 is served by surface tracks that join the Port Manatee Terminal Railroad. Berth 5 is used to ship and receive conventional and heavy-lift cargoes. It receives lumber, sand, gravel, aggregate, steel, and juice concentrate. Vulcan Materials Company has about 10 acres of open storage at the rear of the wharf, and Port Manatee Forestry Terminal Inc. has a 0.8-acre (35 thousand square foot) transit shed at the rear of wharf. Located at the north entrance to the Port Manatee Ship Basin, Berth 5 has berthing space of 365.8 meters (1200 feet) with alongside depth of 12.2 meters (40 feet).

The port authority operates Berth 6 jointly with Florida Rock Industries, Citrosuco North America Inc., and Port Manatee Forestry Terminal Inc. Berth 6 is used to receive and ship conventional cargo and to receive cement and cement clinker, steel and juice concentrate. Berth 6 has no railway connections.

Florida Rock Industries has one 50-thousand ton cement-clinker storage shed at the rear of Berth 6. The bulk storage warehouse is serve4d by one truck-loading spout. A pneumatic pipeline connects Berth 6 with two cement storage silos with total capacity for 7.5 thousand tons at the rear of the wharf. Located at the outer end of the north side of the Port Manatee Ship Basin, Berth 6 has berthing space of 203.6 meters (668 feet) with alongside depth of 12.2 meters (40 feet) MLW.

The port authority operates Berth 7 jointly with Kinder Morgan Bulk Terminals Inc. and Coastal Fuels Marketing Inc. Berth 7 in Port Manatee is used to receive and ship dry bulk commodities and petroleum products. It is also used to receive lumber and asphalt and to bunker vessels. Berth 7 is served by four surface tracks that join the Port Manatee Terminal Railroad and connect with CSX Transportation. The hopper-car pit can service 80-ton cars per hour.

With total capacity for 130 thousand tons of bulk materials, Kinder Morgan Bulk Terminals has a steel frame warehouse and three timber storage warehouses at the rear of Berth 7. Coastal Fuels Marketing has one pipeline for asphalt and four additional pipelines for petroleum products linked to storage tanks at the rear. Located at the inner end of the north side of Port Manatee Ship Basin, Berth 7 has berthing space of 228.6 meters (750 feet) with alongside depth of 12.2 meters (40 feet) MLW.

Manatee County Port Authority operates Berth 8 jointly with Eastern Portland Cement Corporation, Port Manatee Forestry Terminal Inc., WSI of the Southeast LLC, and Coastal Fuels Marketing Inc. Berth 8 has no railway connections. It is used to ship and receive conventional and containerized general cargo and petroleum products. It is also used to receive lumber, asphalt, cement, and steel and to bunker vessels.

Eastern Portland Cement Corporation has four pneumatic pipelines that connect the wharf to four concrete storage silos with total capacity for 44.7 thousand tons at the rear of the wharf. Coastal Fuels Marketing has a pipeline that connects to four asphalt storage tanks with capacity for 400 thousand barrels at the rear of the wharf and three pipelines for petroleum products connected to storage tanks at the rear. There is also a 2.5-acre (110-thousand square foot) steel frame metal shed (No. 2) at the rear of Berth 8. Located at the head of the Port Manatee Ship Basin, Berth 8 has berthing space of 198.1 meters (650 feet) with alongside depth of 12.2 meters (40 feet) MLW.

The port authority operates Berth 9 jointly with WSI of the Southeast LLC, Del Monte Fresh Produce Company, Citrosuco North America Inc., Port Manatee Forestry Terminal Inc., and Coastal Fuels Marketing Inc. Berth 9 has no railway connections. Berth 9 is used to ship and receive conventional and containerized general cargo, juice concentrate, and petroleum products. It also receives automobiles, lumber, steel, and fruits and vegetables. Berth 9 is also used to moor cruise ships and bunker vessels.

Port Manatee Forestry Terminal has a 3.9-acre (171-thousand square foot) transit shed at the rear of Berth 9. Coastal Fuels Marketing has five pipelines connected to storage tanks for petroleum products. There is also a 0.6-acre (25-thousand square foot) cruise terminal building at the rear of Port Manatee's Berth 9. Located at the south inner end of the Port Manatee Ship Basin, Berth 9 has berthing space of 365.8 meters (1200 feet) with alongside depth of 12.2 meters (40 feet) MLW.

Manatee County Port Authority owns and operates Roll-on/Roll-off Berth 8A to ship and receive roll-on/roll-off general and heavy-lift cargo. Located at the south side of the head of the Port Manatee Ship Basin, Berth 8A has berthing space of 396.2 meters (1300 feet) with alongside depth of 12.2 meters (40 feet).

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