Port of Hamburg
Port Commerce

The Port Authority of Hamburg (HPA) was created in 2005 when port-related authorities were unified to assure future-oriented management for the Port of Hamburg. The port authority is responsible for planning development and strategies that promote the interests of Port of Hamburg industry, business, trade, and the public.

The HPA is responsible for restructuring and development projects in the Port of Hamburg that promote port growth in line with market demands. The HPA provides port infrastructure, enhances the port's strategic competitiveness, improves customer services, establishes and maintains long-term customer relations, and represents the Port of Hamburg in its dealings with the European Union and other organizations.

Hamburg Port Authority<br>Administrative building in the Speicherstadt

Hamburg Port Authority
Administrative building in the Speicherstadt

Photo by Emma7stern

In 2010, the Port of Hamburg handled a total of 121.2 million tons of seaborne cargo. That total included 80.9 million tons of general cargo, 78.4 million tons of containerized cargo in 7.9 thousand TEUs as well as 40.3 million tons of bulk, 19.5 million tons of grabber cargo, 14.1 million tons of liquid bulk, and 6.6 million tons of agribulk.

Over 9.8 thousand vessels called at the Port of Hamburg in 2010, including almost 5.3 thousand container vessels, 1.6 thousand bulk carriers, 979 multi-purpose and reefer vessels, 264 roll-on/roll-off ferries, 141 car carriers, 208 passenger vessels, and 88 cruise ships.

While the Port of Hamburg is about 100 kilometers (161 miles) from the North Sea on the River Elbe, it can accommodate the world's biggest bulk carriers and container ships. Efforts are continually underway to accommodate the ever-increasing size of oceangoing cargo vessels.

Container Terminal<br>Hamburg

Container Terminal
Hamburg

Photo by Dan Kollmann

The Port of Hamburg covers a total of about 7.4 hectares, including 4.3 hectares of land. A planned port expansion will add 919 hectares. Within the urban area, the Port of Hamburg occupies 755 square kilometers (186 thousand acres).

There are about 320 berths and 41 kilometers (66 miles) of quays in the Port of Hamburg. Of these, some 199 berths handle general and bulk cargo. There are 83 berths for coastal shipping, 145 berths at dolphins, and 38 berths reserved for container and bulk cargo vessels. Alongside depths at the berths in the Port of Hamburg range from 7 to 17 meters (23 to 55.8 feet). Within the Port of Hamburg are 55 landing facilities, 177 bridges, 170 kilometers (274 miles) of roads, and 350 kilometers (564 feet) of rail tracks.

The Port of Hamburg contains a total of 7.4 million square meters of hard-surface terminal areas. Covered storage areas include over 2.8 million square meters in the Free Port, 350 thousand square meters in inland customs territory, and 150 thousand square meters of air-conditioned covered storage. The Port of Hamburg has 17 roll-on/roll-off terminals for stern- or side-ramp ships and ample equipment to handle these cargoes.

Hansaport Hafen

Hansaport Hafen

Photo by GeorgHH

The Port of Hamburg has silo and storage capacity for about 700 thousand tons of cereals, oil seed, fodder, and other agricultural products and about 700 thousand square meters of storage areas for ores, coal, fertilizers, and other dry bulk cargoes. The Port of Hamburg also has tank storage capacity for about 2.2 million cubic meters liquid cargoes and about 3.6 million cubic meters of refined liquid products.

  • Cargoes

The Port of Hamburg is the busiest center in the world for the trade and storage of oriental carpets. Imports for distribution across Europe arrive in the Port of Hamburg from Iran, India, Pakistan, and Afghanistan. More than 60 carpet trading companies have locations in the Port of Hamburg's historical warehouse district. The Port of Hamburg offers 68 thousand square meters (16.8 acres) of warehouse space.

The Port of Hamburg handles huge volumes of fertilizers for export. Much of the cargo comes from the mines in Hesse, Magdeburg, and Thuringia. Most of the fertilizer bulk cargoes are destined for South America, China, Southeast Asia, and India, although Northern and Western European countries also receive fertilizers. The Port of Hamburg offers high-performance facilities for handling bulk cargoes as well as warehouses and silos.

Fischautkionshall<br>Fish Auction Hall

Fischautkionshall
Fish Auction Hall

Photo by Fusslkopp

The Port of Hamburg Fish Market handles fish and seafood from around the world. Specialty seafoods arrive from Norway, Iceland, Canada, Asia, and South America in -18°C (-0.4°F) reefer containers. Most of the fresh, frozen, and ready-to-eat fish coming to the Port of Hamburg goes to locations in the Hamburg metropolitan area and across Germany; however, from 10 to 15 percent of these cargoes are exported to countries in the European Union and Eastern Europe.

Most of the meat moving through the Port of Hamburg is imported. Argentina, New Zealand, and Brazil are the source for the beef, lamb, and poultry products that normally go to wholesalers in the greater Hamburg region and in Central and South Germany.

The German power and steel industries depend on ore and coal imported through the Port of Hamburg from Brazil, Australia, Scandinavia, and South Africa. Most of these cargoes are transshipped by rail, barges, or feeder ships, but some of the cargo remains in open storage for later transport. Port of Hamburg conveyor systems carry these bulk cargoes from the ships' holds directly to stockpiles. Transfer to rail cars is also automated.

Transport of five gantry cranes for Eurogate Container-Terminal

Transport of five gantry cranes for Eurogate Container-Terminal

Photo by GeorgHH

Today, the Port of Hamburg handles some 800 thousand tons of bananas at its fruit center. Fresh fruit arrives in reefer containers from countries like South Africa, New Zealand, Argentina, and Chile. Traveling in refrigerated containers, these fruit cargoes can go directly to food retailers, so demand for cooling facilities in the Port of Hamburg has decreased. The Port of Hamburg contains warehousing space for about 30 thousand pallets of fruits.

The Port of Hamburg receives gravel and mineral materials for construction from Scotland and Scandinavia bound for concrete and asphalt mixing plants and for road-building companies in the region. Most of the construction materials exported through the Port of Hamburg is bound for Scandinavia and Great Britain.

Germany is the second biggest importer of spices in the world (after the United States). The Port of Hamburg also receives much of the spice cargo imported to Germany. The Port of Hamburg imports about 80 thousand tons of spices each year from India, China, Vietnam, Indonesia, and Brazil. Included in those cargoes are pepper, paprika, kummel, coriander, ginger, and nutmeg. About sixty percent of the spice imports are re-exported to Central and Southeastern Europe. The Port of Hamburg offers services for these cargoes that include cleaning, sieving, stoning, sterilizing, and grinding.

Blohm   Voss Dock 10<br>Hamburger

Blohm Voss Dock 10
Hamburger

Photo by GeorgHH

For raw materials, the metal working industry depends on scrapped industrial equipment and machines and discarded household appliances. Barges transport scrap metal to the Port of Hamburg from its hinterlands, and the scrap is then exported to China and the United States.

After the United States and the Netherlands, Germany is the world's third biggest importer of cocoa beans. In 2010, the Port of Hamburg handled about 80 thousand tons of bagged beans and about 107 thousand tons of bulk beans. Raw cocoa arriving at the Port of Hamburg is mostly processed further by industries in North Germany. In the recent past, more semi-finished cocoa products, like cocoa paste and cocoa butter, are being imported from countries that produce raw cocoa.

For many years, the Port of Hamburg has been Europe's leading trade center for tea. Receiving imports from India, Sri Lanka, China, and Indonesia, the Port of Hamburg handles from 50 to 60 percent of the worldwide tea trade. Of all the tea sold in Germany, about 70% comes through the Port of Hamburg, much of which is blended in Hamburg before being exported around the world. Today, as much as half of the processed tea leaves the Port of Hamburg exports are bound for the United States.

Container ship at dock<br>Hamburg

Container ship at dock
Hamburg

Photo by Dan Kollmann

The Port of Hamburg is the largest port in Germany for raw coffee imports. Coffee beans were first imported from the Near East to the Port of Hamburg in the early 17th Century. Coffee imports were an important reason for the construction of today's historic warehouse quarter. The Port of Hamburg is also the hub for coffee imports bound for Scandinavia and Eastern Europe. Roasters and traders in the region receive most of the imports.

There are many facilities in the Port of Hamburg designed for grain, feedstuffs, and oilseed. The Port of Hamburg has a huge silo with capacity for one million tons of grain, and a wide range of support services for agribulk (like packing, cleaning, and drying) are available.

Aerial view of the Port of Hamburg

Aerial view of the Port of Hamburg

Photo by Wolfgang Meinhart

Handling as much as three million tons of paper and cellulose per year, the Port of Hamburg is an important distribution center in Europe for paper. Raw materials used to make newspapers, catalogs, and books arrive at the Port of Hamburg on feeder vessels.

While 96% of the general cargo handled in the Port of Hamburg is containerized, conventional cargo in crates and bags and on wheels is still important. Heavy and bulk goods like steel pipes must be served as well. The Port of Hamburg has several specialized terminals that handle vehicles, paper and cardboard, fruits and vegetables, scrap, cellulose, magnesite, fertilizers, coffee, sugar, and cocoa.

The Port of Hamburg also handles project consignments, machinery parts, iron and steel pipes, copper plates, and tractor tires. It is one of the most important paper-handling ports and the biggest trade center for pharmaceuticals and raw materials in Europe. Roll-on/roll-off traffic is also a major component of the cargo handled in the Port of Hamburg.

  • Container terminals

Container traffic in the Port of Hamburg is booming. The port has four container terminals and eight multi-purpose terminals that serve container shipments. ThePort of Hamburg has capacity to handle at least 2500 TEUs in a 24-hour period.

Four large container terminals are available in the Port of Hamburg. High-performance handling with short mooring times means that even the biggest container carriers leave the port again after one or two days. The capacity of the terminals is continually being expanded to meet the changing demands of the market and new developments in ship sizes.

Eurogate Terminal

Eurogate Terminal

Photo by Tom Tom

The Port of Hamburg's Eurogate Container Terminal covers 1.2 million square meters (296 acres) and contains six berths with a total of two thousand meters (6824 feet) of quays that have alongside depth of 15.3 meters (50.2 feet). Twenty-one container cranes, including 19 post-Panamax quayside gantry cranes, and over 140 Van Carriers operate 24 hours per day 365 days per year.

The Eurogate Container Terminal in the Port of Hamburg has capacity for 4.5 million TEUs. The Port of Hamburg's Eurogate Container Terminal offers cargo-modal services, inter-modal services, logistics management, and container repairs. It is also a container depot and Germany's biggest rail station for combined cargo traffic.

Altenwerder Container Terminal<br>Hamburg

Altenwerder Container Terminal
Hamburg

Photo by Gunnar Ries

Covering one million square meters (247 acres), the Port of Hamburg's HHLA Container Terminal Altenwerder has four berths with 1.4 thousand meters (4593 feet) of quays with alongside depth of 16.7 meters (54.8 feet). The HHLA Container Terminal Altenwerder has 15 quayside container cranes. This Port of Hamburg terminal has current capacity for 2.4 million TEUs and planned capacity for three million TEUs. The Port of Hamburg's HHLA Container Terminal Altenwerder has 2100 reefer connections.

The biggest cargo-handling facility in the Port of Hamburg, the HHLA Container Terminal Burchardkai covers 1.4 million square meters (346 acres). Over five thousand ships are loaded/unloaded at nine berths with almost 2.9 thousand meters (9.5 thousand feet) of quays and alongside depth of 15.3 meters (50.2 feet).

CTB-CTW Container Terminal Burchardkai

CTB-CTW Container Terminal Burchardkai

Photo by Sebastian

The HHLA Terminal Burchardkai has capacity for 2.8 million TEUs and plans to increase that capacity to 5.2 million TEUs. The terminal also has 25 quayside container cranes. The HHLA Container Terminal Burchardkai in the Port of Hamburg has 700 reefer connections and a container freight terminal with rail connections to the port and national railways.

The Port of Hamburg's HHLA Container Terminal Tollerort GmbH covers 600 thousand square meters (148 acres). Its four berths have 1230 meters (4035 feet) of quays with alongside depth of 15.2 meters (50 feet), and there are plans to add two more berths.

The HHLA Container Terminal Tollerort in the Port of Hamburg terminal has 12 quayside container cranes. The terminal has capacity for 950 thousand TEUs today and plans additional capacity for 2 million TEUs. The HHLA Tollerort terminal has 320 reefer connections and its own container rail station with 720 meters (2362 feet) of track.

The BUSS Kuhwerder Terminal GmbH in the Port of Hamburg has a 380-meter-long berth with alongside depth of 11.5 meters and discharge rate of 15 thousand tons per day. This Port of Hamburg terminal contains 143 thousand square meters of open yards and 65 thousand square meters of covered space.

The Port of Hamburg's BUSS Umschlagsges Kuhwerder Terminal specializes in containers and project cargo. Its two berths have 1000 meters (3281 feet) of quay with alongside depth of 11.5 meters (37.7 feet). The terminal covers 280 thousand square meters (69.2 acres) including 65 thousand square meters (16.1 acres) of covered storage.

The BUSS Umschlagsges Kuhwerder Terminal in the Port of Hamburg has rail connections to the freight railway station in Hamburg-Sud. It is equipped with four cranes with capacity for 40, 45, and (2) 8 tons), one 140-ton capacity mobile crane, and one hopper for bulk transshipment.

  • Bulk and breakbulk terminals

In 2010, the Port of Hamburg handled, stored, or forwarded about 40 million metric tons of bulk cargo. Dry bulk cargoes like grain, animal feed, and oilseed are a major cargo group in the Port of Hamburg, both as imports and exports. With capacity to store about one million tons, the Port of Hamburg is Europe's busiest ports for bulk cargo.

The Port of Hamburg also has ample storage space for ore, coal, and building materials and other moisture-sensitive cargoes. The channels in the Port of Hamburg are deep enough for bulk vessels to be loaded/unloaded at low tide. All bulk terminals can support inter-modal transshipments between oceangoing vessels and barges, river vessels, rail, and truck.

Hansaport Hafen

Hansaport Hafen

Photo by GeorgHH

The terminal at Hansaport Hafen in the Port of Hamburg has capacity to discharge as much as 15 million metric tons of iron ore and coal per year. Covering 86.5 acres, the terminal is the largest seaport terminal in Germany. The four berths have a total of 760 meters (2493 feet) of quays and 240 meters (787 feet) that serve small vessels and barges. The terminal berths have alongside depth of 15.1 meters (49.5 feet). This Port of Hamburg terminal has four grab cranes, each with lifting capacity of 38 tons. The terminal also has 15 rail tracks for block trains.

The Port of Hamburg's Kali-Transport Gesellschaft mbH Terminal at Kalikai specializes in handling fertilizers like magnesium and potash products. About 500 oceangoing vessels and inland barges carry up to 4.5 million metric tons at this Port of Hamburg terminal every year, including a daily capacity for 27 tons of loose and bagged bulk cargo in containers.

The Kalikai terminal covers 95 thousand square meters (23.5 acres) in the Port of Hamburg and includes storage capacity for 405 thousand cubic meters in 12 sheds and six silos. This Port of Hamburg terminal has one 500-meter (1640-foot) long berth with alongside depth of 11.3 meters (37.1 feet). It has two grab cranes and three ship loaders. With loading capacity of about 20 thousand tons per ship per day, the Port of Hamburg's Kalikai terminal can also accommodate up to 200 containers.

The Port of Hamburg contains three agribulk terminals that allow ships to dock next to large silos and unload cargoes via stationary high-capacity chain conveyors. The Port of Hamburg has silo capacity for about one million tons of cargo.

The G.T.H. Getreide Terminal is the largest company in the Port of Hamburg that handles and warehouses grains and agricultural products, primarily grain, oilseed, and green coffee. Oceangoing vessels can moor at the 270-meter (886-foot) berth with alongside depth of 12.4 meters (40.7 feet). There are also three berths at this Port of Hamburg terminal for barges and feeder vessels.

The Vopak Dupeg NEUHOF Hafengesellschaft Terminal in the Port of Hamburg has two main berths. One berth for discharging cargoes is 280 meters (917 feet) long with alongside depth of 13.7 meters (44.9 feet), and it has a discharge rate of 1.6 thousand tons per hour. The second berth in this Port of Hamburg terminal is used for loading. It is 190 (623 feet) meters long with alongside depth of 11 meters (36.1 feet) and has a loading rate of 1.2 thousand tons per hour. The terminal's silo facility has capacity for 180 thousand tons. The tank farm for sweet oils has capacity for 25 thousand tons. The NEUHOE terminal in the Port of Hamburg has both rail and truck connections.

The Port of Hamburg's Silo P. Kruse (German) has one berth for bulk carriers of up to 275 meter (902 feet) berth with alongside depth of 12.6 meters (41.3 feet) and one berth for unloading barges using the inland waterways.

Covering about 25 thousand square meters (6.1 acres), the Silo P. Kruse terminal in the Port of Hamburg handles and stores pet food, oilseed, and grain, and it has 200 silo cells with storage capacity for 80 thousand metric tons. The Kruse terminal has two pneumatic systems and one grab crane and can process about one thousand tons of cargo per hour. This Port of Hamburg terminal offers a drying plant, pest control, and product washing services.

Five terminals in the Port of Hamburg handle mineral dry bulk cargoes including coal, ore, building materials, and other dry bulk. All of the terminals have inter-modal handling between ocean-going and inland waterway vessels or rail or road transport. The Port of Hamburg offers rainproof handling and storage facilities for sensitive goods like potash.

The Hansaport Hafenbetriebs Gesellschaft terminal in the Port of Hamburg has 760 meters of quay with alongside depth of 15.6 meters and can discharge up to 70 thousand tons of coal and oil cargoes per day. It offers 350 thousand square meters of open yards in the Port of Hamburg.

The Port of Hamburg's Rhenus Midgard AG & Co. KG Terminal handles a variety of cargoes ranging from construction materials, scrap, agricultural bulk, paper, and minerals to dangerous cargoes. This Port of Hamburg terminal has capacity for 2.5 million metric tons of cargo per year. The terminal's three berths have 500 meters (1640 feet) of quay with alongside depth of 10.8 meters (35.4 feet) and a discharge rate from ten to 75 thousand tons of cargo per day.

The Rhenus Midgard terminal in the Port of Hamburg covers 155 thousand square meters (38.3 acres), includes 12 thousand square meters (almost three acres) of covered storage space. The terminal is equipped with two gantry cranes with capacity for 16 tons, two slewing cranes with capacity for 45 and 60 tons, and a mobile excavator. This Port of Hamburg terminal has inter-modal connections with rail, roads, and inland waterways.

The BUSS Ross Terminal GmbH & Company KG handles bulk cargo, scrap metal, waste materials, sulfate, steel, and other conventional cargoes. This Port of Hamburg terminal covers 50 thousand square meters (12.4 acres) and has a 230-meter (755-foot) berth with alongside depth of 11.5 meters (37.7 feet).

The Port of Hamburg's BUSS Ross terminal is equipped with one mobile crane with maximum capacity for 104 tons, one mobile excavator with maximum capacity of 25 tons, and a variety of grabs and hoppers for direct transshipment by ship or truck. It also has rail connections to the freight railway station in Hamburg-Sud.

Covering 165 thousand square meters (40.8 acres), the Port of Hamburg's Eichholtz GmbH Terminal specializes in handling green coffee, nuts, cocoa, seeds, dried fruit, legumes, dry bulk cargo, non-food goods, over-sized cargoes, and commercial goods of all types. With three 440-meter (1444-foot) quays with alongside depth of 11 meters (36.1 feet), 100 thousand square meters (24.7 acres) of the terminal is in the Port of Hamburg Free Port.

The Eichholtz GmbH Terminal in the Port of Hamburg offers a variety of services. Finishing processes include sieving, sorting, and cleaning facilities that have state-of-the-art X-ray technology for the best cleaning of foods and commodities. This Port of Hamburg terminal also offers mixing, packing, and weighing facilities and the most modern refrigerating facilities in Europe with cooling capacity to between 6°C (43°F) and 12°C (54°F) with constant 65% humidity.

The Port of Hamburg's ADM Hamburg Aktiengesellschaft (German), or Silo Hamburg, handles feedstuffs, oil seeds, vegetable oils, sweet oils, and grain. One of Germany's highest capacity cargo-handling elevators, its pneumatic conveyor can move 1200 tons per hour. With four berths with 175 meters of quay (574 feet) and a maximum draught of 12.3 meters (40.4 feet), the Silo Hamburg can handle ships to 280 meters (917 feet) with payloads up to 90 metric tons on a 24-hour basis.

This Port of Hamburg terminal has three elevator systems. One mechanical discharge tower can move one thousand tons per hour. Two pneumatic elevators can each handle 350 tons per hour. One loader has capacity for 1200 tons per hour. The Port of Hamburg silo facility has capacity to store 180 thousand tons, and the tank farm for sweet oils has capacity for 86 thousand tons. This Port of Hamburg terminal has rail connections and is set up for truck dispatch.

  • Oil / Liquid terminals

The Port of Hamburg has several highly-specialized tank storage companies that are designed for the safe handling and storing of liquid bulk cargoes including petroleum, concentrated fruit juices, alcohol, palm oil, latex, and acids.

The Dutch Vopak concern in the Port of Hamburg operates two high-performance Vopak Dupeg terminals that handle a range of petroleum products, mineral oil products, vegetable oils, chemicals, carbonic acid, green fuel, and latex. With four jetties with alongside depth of 12.6 meters, the Vopak Dupeg terminals are equipped with 300 tanks with capacity for 702 thousand cubic meters of cargo. These Port of Hamburg terminals are served by all modes of transport, including pipelines. The terminals have four jetties with maximum draught of 12 meters (39.4 feet). The terminals have capacity for 715 thousand cubic meters of liquid bulk cargoes in 275 tanks.

Among the seven terminals in the Port of Hamburg that handle and store liquid bulk cargoes, the Bominflot Tanklager GmbH (Petroleumhafen) has capacity to accommodate ships up to 200 meters (656 feet) with maximum draft of 8.8 meters (28.9 feet). The terminal has three jetties supporting oceangoing vessels and three jetties for coasters and barges.

The Petroleumhafen terminal in the Port of Hamburg covers 120 thousand square meters (almost 30 acres), and it is equipped with loading and discharging arms for ships. It has a tank farm with capacity for 236 thousand cubic meters (2 million barrels). This Port of Hamburg terminal also has a rail tank wagon filling and discharging station and a tank truck filling station.

The Port of Hamburg's Haltermann Products Werk Hamburg handles bulk mineral oil products and vegetable oils. With alongside depth of 7.35 meters, it has one berth for ocean-going vessels and one berth for inland waterway vessels.

  • Ro/Ro terminals

The Port of Hamburg Rhenus Midgard GmbH & Company KG Dradenau Terminal handles cars, general and project cargo, and containers. Three berths have 350 meters (1148 feet) of quay with alongside depth of 11.3 meters (37.7 feet). The terminal has two roll-on/roll-off berths and two lift-on/lift-off berths alongside depth of 11.5 meters.

The 155 thousand square meter (38-acre) Dradenau Terminal in the Port of Hamburg includes 50 thousand square meters (12.4 acres) of covered storage with capacity for 25 thousand TEUs. The Dradenau Terminal has rail connections, reefer connections, and container fumigation services. This Port of Hamburg terminal is equipped with one 104-ton capacity mobile crane, reach stackers, and several 28-ton forklifts. The terminal has rail, road, and inland waterway connections.

The Unikai Lagerei- und Speditionsgesellschaft Terminal (German) in the Port of Hamburg covers an area of one million square meters and specializes in handling roll-on/roll-off cargoes including vehicles, forest products, and handling for cruisers. The one million square foot (247 acre) terminal is equipped with one container gantry and one 104-ton capacity harbor mobile crane. With two 800-meter ro-ro berths with alongside depth of 11.5 meters, the terminal has rail connections.

  • Multi-purpose terminals

In addition to containers, the Port of Hamburg's multi-purpose terminals handle heavy-lift, conventional, and project cargo. In 2010, conventional general cargo of 2.6 million metric tons was handled in the Port of Hamburg.

The Port of Hamburg's Wallmann & Company / Wallman Terminal handles general and heavy-lift cargoes, project cargo, and containers. This multi-purpose terminal covers 130 thousand square meters (32.1 acres), including 60 thousand square meters (13.6 acres) of warehouse space. The terminal specializes in storing hazardous goods and has rail connections.

The Wallmann Terminal in the Port of Hamburg has on-dock rail tracks for loading/unloading heavy loads directly to or from railcars. It also has direct connections with Germany's highway system. The Port of Hamburg's Wallmann Terminal has three berths with 640 meters (2100 feet) of quays and alongside depth of 13 meters (42.7 feet). It is equipped with two quay cranes the capacity to 45 tons and two 140-ton capacity mobile cranes.

The BUSS Group is one of the Port of Hamburg's biggest port and logistics providers, and it operates three terminals in the Port of Hamburg: the BUSS Hansa Terminal, the BUSS Ross Terminal, and the BUSS Kuhwerder Terminal.

The Port of Hamburg's BUSS Hansa Terminal specializes in roll-on/roll-off, heavy lift, project cargo, and containers. Covering 300 thousand square meters (74 acres), including 37 thousand square meters (9.1 acres) of shed space and 70 thousand square meters (17.3 acres) of expansion space. This Port of Hamburg terminal has 840 meters (2756 feet) of quay with alongside depth of 12.5 meters (41 feet). The terminal has rail connections to the freight railway station in Hamburg-Sud.

The Port of Hamburg's BUSS Hansa Terminal is equipped with two container gantry cranes, four quay cranes (three with capacity for 104 tons), ten reach-stackers, ten tug-masters, and many terminal trailers. It is equipped with two 32-ton capacity forklifts suitable for ro-ro cargoes and 18 8-ton capacity forklifts.

The BUSS Hansa Terminal in the Port of Hamburg has two ro-ro rams for vessels with stern ramps and one ro-ro ramp for vessels with quarter ramps. This Port of Hamburg terminal also has capacity to store 350 thousand TEUs of containerized cargo and a container depot.

The C. Steinweg (Sud-West) Terminal in the Port of Hamburg handles containers, breakbulk cargo, project cargo, roll-on/roll-off cargo including vehicles, forest products, and ferrous and non-ferrous metals. This 215 thousand square meter (53.1 acre) multi-purpose terminal in the Port of Hamburg contains six berths with 1300 meters (4265 feet) of quays with alongside depth of 13.1 meters (43 feet). The terminal includes an operating area of 145 square meters (35.8 acres) and covered storage of 70 thousand square meters (17.3 acres).

The Steinweg Sud-West Terminal in the Port of Hamburg has ten multi-purpose cranes with capacity for up to 150 tons. The terminal has capacity for 250 thousand TEUs and two million tons of breakbulk cargo. It has full rail and road access.

  • Cruise terminals

The Port of Hamburg has long been a popular destination for cruise ships. There are two cruise centers in the Port of Hamburg.

Hamburg Cruise Center Altona

Hamburg Cruise Center Altona

Photo by Gerd Fahrenhorst

The Cruise Terminal Altona opened in 2011, boasting some of the finest modern architecture in northern Europe. The terminal has two thousand square meters (21.5 thousand square feet) on one floor with an adjacent parking garage with 380 spaces. The Altona Cruise Center in the Port of Hamburg has one berth with a 360-meter (1148-foot) quay for ships to 300 meters (984 feet) and alongside depth of 12 meters (39.4 feet).

The Port of Hamburg's Cruise Center HafenCity combines the industrial charm of the port with the modern ambiance of HafenCity. The terminal building covers 1200 square meters (12.9 thousand square feet). It has two berths with 625 meters (2050 feet) of quays and a short-term parking garage with up to 350 spaces.

  • Tug boat operators

The Port of Hamburg has about 20 tugboats that assist oceangoing vessels move through the port and dock. Armed with powerful motors, the tugboats have a bollard pull of as much as 75 tons and Voith-Schneider or Schottel propulsion. Of the seven tugboat companies in the Port of Hamburg, five belong to the Joint Tugboat Service. They are: H.S.N. Hafen Service Hamburg, Bugsier-Reederei- und Bergunsges mbH & Co., Carl Robert Eckelmann Transport und Logistik GmbH, and L&R Lutgens & Reimers GmbH & Co. KG (German).

  • Rail and intermodal connections

The Port of Hamburg is one of Europe's most important transshipment centers. Three railway stations and 375 kilometers (605 miles) of rail track ensure timely reliable transportation with connections to railways throughout Germany and Europe.

Sixty rail companies offer connections between the Port of Hamburg and its hinterland, and more than 200 international and domestic connections serve the port every day. The Port of Hamburg Railway maintains 330 kilometers (523 miles) of track to assure that transshipment and rail transportation services operate smoothly and efficiently.

Highway systems link the Port of Hamburg to the nearby industrial regions and international business centers. The radial network of highways serve long-haul traffic moving in and out of the Port of Hamburg, including about 80 kilometers (129 miles) of high-speed highway, is constantly being expanded to meet ever-increasing demands. Trucks move millions of containers over the city's street every year.

The Port of Hamburg has perfected the art of handling ships, barges, and cargo over inland waterways that offer an affordable alternative for moving bulk, dangerous cargoes, and containers within the region to other inland ports. Cargo is transported to Berlin by inland waterways on a regular basis. Further, barges play an increasing role in moving cargo within the Port of Hamburg itself.

In 2010, almost 50 feeder services made more than 150 departures from the Port of Hamburg in 2010, more than any other port in Europe. Oceangoing deep-sea cargoes and distributed throughout the region on smaller container ships and barges.

  • Shipyards

The Port of Hamburg is busy with building, refitting, repair, conversions, and overhaul of container ships, luxury yachts, barges, and a variety of special-purpose vessels. There are over ten shipyards in the Port of Hamburg engaged in the building and repair of all types of vessels.

Blohm-Voss Shipyard

Blohm-Voss Shipyard

Photo by Mbdortmund

The largest Port of Hamburg shipyard is Blohm + Voss, which specializes in ship repair and conversion. This Port of Hamburg shipyard has five docks that can accommodate vessels to 320 thousand DWT, including a 352-meter (1155-foot) dry dock. The training and sailing ship Gorch Foch was launched at the Blohm + Voss shipyards, and the Queen Mary II has docked at Blohm + Voss' dry dock for repairs and refitting.

J.J. Sietas Shipyard

J.J. Sietas Shipyard

Photo by GeorgHH

The Sietas Shipyard in the Port of Hamburg constructs container feeder vessels and heavy lift and special-purpose ships. Founded in 1635, it one of the world's oldest family-run businesses. The Sietas Shipyard builds about 12 new vessels per year on two floating platforms. Vessels include container ships, heavy-lift ships, roll-on/roll-off vessels, bulkers, tankers.

Operating from three floating dry docks with a total quay length of 450 meters (1476 feet), Norderwerft offers ship repair and conversion services. It also repairs ship equipment and builds cranes and masts.

  • Port services

The Port of Hamburg offer professional pilots with knowledge and experience of local waters. Ships of 90 meters (295 feet) or more are required to use the service of harbor pilots. For particularly difficult maneuvers, a second pilot will come aboard to ensure safety and efficiency in the sometimes cramped Port of Hamburg basins. The Harbour Pilots' Association has been operating since 1981, replacing the earlier harbor pilots employed by the City of Hamburg.

The Port of Hamburg is home to the Verband fur Schiffbau und Meerestechnik (VSM) (German), the Association for Shipbuilding and Marine Technology, that represents the German maritime industry, shipyards, shipbuilding suppliers, and marine engineers. In addition to supporting technical and economic development of the industry, the Association provides technical assistance to its members and represents them with the public and political institutions.

Container services are abundant in the Port of Hamburg. A variety of companies offer leasing, repair, and storage for empty containers. Container repairs are frequently done in the terminal, but there are conveniently located container repair workshops throughout the Port of Hamburg. There are also many container depots and leasing businesses that provide short- or long-term leasing of boxes as well as interim storage of empty containers.

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