Port of Havana
Port Commerce

The Empresa Terminales Mambisas de la Habana owns and operates the Port of Havana for the Cuban government. The Port of Havana lies on the shores of Havana Harbor, and it is Cuba's main seaport. The Port of Havana's harbor is entered through a short straight channel (length of 1.5 kilometers or one mile, width from 220 to 330 meters or 722 to 1083 feet, and depth of 12.8 meters or 42 feet), and the harbor is divided into three main anchorage areas: Marimelena, Atares, and Guanabacoa.

Marimelena Cove (Ensenada de Marimelena) is the commercial and industrial arm of the Port of Havana, containing the Galainela Shipyard, the ENA dry dock, and the Navy's shipyard. The Port of Havana Container Terminal (TCH), Nico Lopez oil refinery, wheat and flour mills, and depots for aviation fuel are located in this Port of Havana harbor. Atares Cove (Ensenada de Atares) is the harbor for Old Havana, and it is the port of call for cruise vessels. There are also shipping and vessel repair services in Atares Cove. Guanabacoa Cove (Ensenada de Guanabacoa) is the least developed arm of Havana Harbor.

On East Windward where the Morro Lighthouse and Castle are located, the entry point to the Port of Havana is called the W. Leeward Canal. There are three main anchorages in the Port of Havana. The Tasajera anchorage, Berth No. 1, is in the Port of Havana central part. The berth can handle five vessels of up to 230 meters (755 feet) in length with a 10-meter (32.8-foot) draft. The bottom is hard mud, and the area is protected from all but strong winds from the north.

The Casablanca anchorage is north of the Port of Havana's access channel that goes to the refinery. Cruise ships and coasting vessels use this anchorage. Berth No. 2 can accommodate four vessels with maximum length of 165 meters (541 feet). Depths range from 7.6 to 8.2 meters (24.9 to 26.9 feet), and the bottom is soft mud.

The third anchorage in the Port of Havana is the Mooring of Guasabacoa, or Berth No. 3, which can handle three vessels with maximum length of 150 meters (492 feet) and maximum draft of 7.03 meters (23.1 feet). Depths at the Port of Havana's Berth No. 3 range from 4.6 to 11.9 meters (15.1 to 39 feet). The Port of Havana's Mooring of Guasabacoa serves fishing and larger vessels.

The Port of Havana handles large volumes of foreign cargo that includes containers, bulk cargo, timber, food, automobile oil and other liquid cargoes, building materials, and a wide range of general cargo. The Port of Havana also offers services that include vessel repair, salvage, rescue, and pilotage as well as customs and freight forwarding.

  • Container terminals

The Port of Havana Container Terminal (THC) (Spanish) is a state-of-the-art facility that has been operating in the Port of Havana since 1996 as a Cuban-Spanish joint venture. Located ideally at the entrance to the Gulf of Mexico, the Port of Havana is an important transshipment point for cargoes moving between North and South America and between Europe and the Americas.

The THC in the Port of Havana has total berths of 450 meters (1476 feet) with alongside depth of 9.75 meters (32 feet). The terminal occupies 18 hectares and includes a 2.2-acre sheltered warehouse with 340 reefer outlets. The Port of Havana Container Terminal is open year-round 24 hours a day for the loading and unloading of vessels. The terminal gates are open Monday through Friday from 7am to 11pm and from 7am to 3m on Saturdays, although the Port of Havana will schedule other times for reception/delivery at other times.

The Port of Havana Container Terminal is equipped with three Panamax gantry cranes (30-, 40-, and 50-ton capacity) and one Panamax mobile crane (52-ton capacity). The Port of Havana Container Terminal also has eight straddle carriers. The Port of Havana Container Terminal's container yard has a mix of cargo-handling technology that includes two rail-mounted gantry cranes, 12 straddle carriers, eight frontal stackers for empty containers, three reach stackers, four forklift trucks, and a variety of terminal tractors and trailers. The Port of Havana Container Terminal is protected by a specialized security service and 24-hour monitoring.

The Port of Havana Container Terminal serves the world's largest shipping companies including CMA-CGM, Costa Container Lines, Crowley Liner Services, ZIM, and Holland Maas. There is a full-service custom station within the terminal that facilitates the import and export of goods. Other services available at this Port of Havana terminal include loading/unloading container vessels, container inspections and weighing, stuffing/unstuffing, storage, delivery and reception of general cargo.

The Facilidades Maritimos Dock in the Port of Havana is used to receive private container cargoes. With berthing distance of 248 meters (813.6 feet) with alongside depth of 8.84 meters (29 feet), the terminal has about ten acres of open storage for containers.

In 2011, President Raul Castro and Brazil's former President Luiz Inacio toured the Mariel Port in the Port of Havana where modern port facilities were being constructed to meet increasing shipping demands. Brazil's Odebrect Group (Portuguese) is working with a construction company from Cuba on the project. The first stage of construction involved 700 meters (2296 feet) of docks with alongside depth of 15 meters (49.2 feet). Located about 45 kilometers (28 miles) west of the Port of Havana, Muriel Port will be connected to the Port of Havana by integrated highway and rail systems. The project includes a container terminal to handle large-draft ships, the depth of which the Port of Havana cannot accommodate.

  • Bulk and breakbulk terminals

The Margarito Iglesias Terminal in the Port of Havana's Atares Cove has three concrete piers to handle general cargo. Each pier has two berths with berthing distance of 135 meters (443 feet). Piers 1 and 2 have alongside depth of 6.1 meters (20 feet) on both sides. Pier 3 has alongside depths of 5.4 and 9.75 meters (17.7 and 32 feet). This Port of Havana terminal has a 2787 square meter (30 thousand square foot) warehouse.

Devoted to general cargo, the Port of Havana Central Pier has two berths with berthing distance of 132 and 146 meters (433 and 479 feet) with alongside depth of 9.1 and 9.75 meters (29.9 and 32.0 feet). The Central Pier in the Port of Havana has a 1.1-acre warehouse.

The Aracelio Iglesias Terminal in the Port of Havana has a dock and two berths totaling 469.4 meters (1540 feet) in length. The dock has berthing distance of 174.6 meters (572.8 feet) with alongside depth of 8.53 meters. The north side berth has berthing distance of 157.8 meters (517.7 feet) with alongside depth of 10.5 meters (34.4 feet), and the south side berth has berthing distance of 137 meters (450 feet) with alongside depth of 10.36 meters (34 feet). The Port of Havana's Aracelio Iglesias Terminal has two warehouses with total capacity for 2,787 square meters (30 thousand square feet) of cargo.

The Juan Manuel Diaz Terminal in the Port of Havana has total berthing space of 619.3 meters (2032 feet) with alongside depths from 7 to 10.25 meters (23 to 33.6 feet). Dock No. 2 has berthing distance of 146.6 meters (481 feet) with alongside depth of 7.3 meters (24 feet). Dock No. 3 has berthing distance of 158.8 meters (521 feet) with alongside depth of 7.9 meters (25.9 feet). The north side pier at this Port of Havana terminal has berthing distance of 152.4 meters (500 feet) with alongside depth of 7.01 meters (23 feet). The south side pier has berthing distance of 161.5 meters (529.9 feet) with alongside depth of 10.25 meters (33.6 feet). The Port of Havana's Juan Manuel Diaz Terminal has three warehouses with total capacity for over two hectares of cargo.

The Osvaldo Sanchez Docks are used to discharge lumber in the Port of Havana. The two docks have berthing distance of 130.5 meters (428.1 feet) with alongside depth of 4.88 meters (16 feet) and berthing distance of 155.7 meters (510.8 feet) with alongside depth of 5.49 meters (18 feet). Warehouse capacity at this Port of Havana facility is 1858 square meters (200 thousand square feet).

The Commander Turcios Lima Grain Terminal in the Port of Havana is used for bulk grains, general, and refrigerated cargoes. The pier has berthing distance of 237 meters (777 feet) with alongside depth of 9.6 meters (31.5 feet). The Turcios Lima Grain Terminal has storage capacity for about 30 thousand tons of cargo.

The Port of Havana's Jose Antonio Escheverria Terminal is used to handle bulk grain cargoes. It has berthing distance of 152 meters (499 feet) with alongside depth of 9.75 meters (32 feet). The 36 grain elevators at this Port of Havana terminal have total capacity for 20 thousand tons of grain and can discharge up to 1200 tons per day.

The Andres Gonzales Lines Terminal in the Port of Havana has three piers, two of which are not currently in use. Vertraco Shipping B.V. operates Berths 22 and 23, each with berthing distance of 190 meters (623.4 feet). Berth 22 has alongside depth of 9.4 meters (30.8 feet), and Berth 23 has alongside depth of 9.7 meters (31.9 feet). Berth 22 is equipped with one 40-ton, two 16-ton, and one eight-ton mobile shore cranes. Berth 23 at this Port of Havana facility is equipped with one 20-ton, one 12-ton, and one eight-ton mobile shore cranes. The Andres Gonzales Lines Terminal handles bulk fertilizers and coal.

  • Oil / Liquid terminals

The Port of Havana's Nico Lopez Oil Terminal receives and sends crude oil and its by-products. The terminal has two piers for large vessels and one small service dock. Pier 1 has berthing distance of 312 and 302 meters (1027 and 991 feet) with alongside depths of 10.67 and 11.4 meters (35 and 37.4 feet), respectively. Each of Pier 2's berths has berthing distance of 302 meters (991 feet) with alongside depth of 11.4 meters (37.4 feet). The service dock has berthing distance of 100 meters (328.1 feet) with alongside depth of four meters (13.1 feet). The Nico Lopez Terminal in the Port of Havana serves the country's biggest oil refinery, which has capacity to process 120 thousand barrels of crude oil per day.

  • Ro/Ro terminals

The Haiphong Terminal in the Port of Havana has five berths that handle general cargo, containers, scrap metal, lumber, structural steel, and vehicles. Serving roll-on/roll-off vessels, the terminal has onside rail and truck service. With total berthing distance of 850 meters (2788 feet), three berths have berthing distance of 524.9 meters (160 feet) with alongside depth of 9.75 meters (32 feet), one has berthing distance of 200 meters (656.2 feet) with alongside depth of 9.75 meters (32 feet), and one has berthing distance of 170 meters (557.7 feet) with alongside depth of 8.6 meters (28.2 feet). The Haiphong Terminal in the Port of Havana has a total area of 22.3 hectares that includes 2.8 hectares of warehouses and ample open storage space.

  • Cruise terminals

Located in Atares Cove near Old Havana, the Terminal Sierra Maestra serves the many cruise vessels calling at the Port of Havana. Centrally located in the Port of Havana, the Terminal Sierra Maestra is ideal for walking tours of the beautiful historic areas of town. With alongside depth of 9.75 meters (32 feet), the Port of Havana's Terminal Sierra Maestra has three berths with berthing distance of 201.8 meters (662.1 feet, one berth with berthing distance of 183.5 meters (602 feet), one berth with berthing distance of 190.5 meters (625 feet), and one berth with berthing distance of 171.3 meters (562 feet). The Sierra Maestra Terminal in the Port of Havana is operated by the Havana Dock Corporation, and it has a 6.2-acre roofed warehouse.

  • Port services

The Puerto Pesquero de la Habana serves the Port of Havana's commercial fishing fleet. This facility has eight berths ranging in length from 260 meters (853 feet) to 89 meters (292 feet). All but one pier have alongside depth of 7.92 meters (26 feet). Pier 6 has alongside depth of 4.78 meters (15.7 feet). The terminal specializes in handling sea products. Facilities at this Port of Havana terminal include more than 929 square meters (10 thousand square feet) of refrigerated warehouse space, fish processing shops, and a large shop for repairs. It also has 6.9 acres of warehouse capacity.

The Caribbean Drydock Company SA manages the Havana Shipyard. Based on the east side of the Port of Havana, the shipyard has two dry docks, a graving dock, and a floating dock. The shipyard can handle repair work on vessels to 65 thousand DWT, and it has dry dock capacity for vessels to 15 thousand DWT.

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